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ULTRA VIOLET: “Pain is beauty and I’m the prettiest.”

Tuesday, June 30th, 2015

Violet Chachki, “a one of a kind collectable,” is an American drag queen, burlesque dancer, aerial acrobat, model, and singer. Chachki competed on and won the seventh season of “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” It wasn’t long ago that she was using a fake I.D. to sneak in and perform in local Atlanta drag shows. Violet’s name is derived from Jennifer Tilly’s character in the super sexy film Bound, which is a must see for any fetishist. Ms. Chachki definitely has the C.U.N.T. (charisma, uniqueness, nerve, and talent) needed to command a crowd and slay the masses. With her first EP, Gagged, being released today (along with her second music video: “Vanguard), her career is at an all time high. Violet is on top of the world at the youthful age of 23. She has obviously moved onto bigger things, but has the class to never say better. Violet is wise beyond her years and is here to tell us all about it.

Let me first say that I love you and love the video for “Bettie.” I rank it near the top of drag music/drag videos I have seen in the realm of Drag Race “herstory.” It’s hella kinky. Bettie Page and yourself are both southern “queens” and your likeness cannot be denied. How has she inspired you?

Thank you! Initially I think I saw Bettie Page as a fashion and style icon. After learning more about her life, where she came from, and her retirement, I think I began to respect her more as a cultural phenomenon.  One thing I truly admire about her is that she refused to do any face-to-face interviews after her retirement; she wanted to be remembered for the way she looked when she was modeling.

I would say that though Bettie is an obvious comparison, due to your stunning video, your live performances are way more Dita Von Teese. What are your inspirations outside of performing?

Oh there’s a ton: Legendary model Dovima. DJ and Deee-lite front woman Lady Miss Kier. Tons of fashion designers like Thierry Mugler, Emilio Pucci; also Leigh Bowery, Candy Darling, Marc Almond, Pierre Molinier, John Willie.

How has your interest in fashion history, BDSM, and drag had a hand in your interest in corsets?

What always appealed to me about the fetish, drag, and fashion world was all of the different extremes. Corset training is considered a form of body modification, along with fetish footwear. I would say its one most extreme items you could decorate your body with. I think the notion that suffering for your art takes a lot of reverence and self-control is beautiful.

Have you done any waist training or are you just skinny and able to pull that down to 18 inches?

Well both. I have a super long and lean torso so it’s easy to train. But trust me I train! During filming I was sleeping in my under-bust.

Speaking of BDSM, can you please illuminate me about your past in some of the largest dungeons within the southeast?

I’ve had the privilege of working alongside a well-known dominatrix, assisting her in a fetish practice called f*rced feminization. It’s a humiliation fetish where gender roles are switched; men give up control and become submissive to a dominatrix through costume or makeup. It created a safe space for these men to come and explore their feminine side and kink without judgment.

What role will your fetish experience play in your future performances and do you think you could inspire an interest in fetishism amongst fans?

Oh, fetish plays a role in a lot of my performances.  I think every drag queen in is some way an exhibitionist.  When I’m onstage I am definitely trying to exude the confidence of a dominatrix, that notion of total control is important when giving a show. I’m actually in the process of creating a number or two paying tribute to my favorite fetish artists John Willie and Pierre Molinier.

They say there is no shame in the game. What are your thoughts on sex negativity vs. sex positivity?

 I went to catholic school for K-12, so sex was always condemned and never celebrated. However, I believe sex is the most creative thing that one can participate in. This might be cliché to say, but Madonna really said it best: “I’m not sorry, it’s human nature…Express yourself, don’t repress yourself.”

What is your take on slut shaming?

For me it all comes back to consent. Obviously, I’m against slut shaming, but if you’re being deceitful and not respecting others’ personal space (emotionally and physically), there should be some internal shame happening.

You have every reason to take pride in you short moment in the “porn spotlight.” You look great: all of you. Care to reflect on having let it all hang out?

Thank you! I was 18 at the time and really getting into the idea of sexual freedom. I think I wanted to try porn as a way of sexual exploration, self-expression, and, most significantly, exhibitionism.

Issues of gender identity are seeing more and more light every day. In your opinion, are they moving too quickly and therefore misguided or is there no such thing if they are moving forward?

Too quickly?! This has been a long time coming! I just hope this moment doesn’t fade. We need to keep fueling the fire! Even a misguided conversation can lead to something progressive as long as it’s being talked about openly and in return learning something new about one another.

You have said that you think drag is very transgressive and that you were confused as to why there was such a separation between drag and the Trans community. Being genderqueer and an activist, would you like to blur that line and try and put a big ol’ D on the ever growing LGBTQ acronym and do you think we can in fact all be one?

I think the verbiage is what separates us. Not everything is black and white. At what point does someone become trans? At what point is someone in drag? Everyone falls somewhere on the Kinsey scale. I really love the term queer because it is all inclusive and literally means “not the norm.”

Drag is becoming more mainstream every day, though ever evolving. Do you think it’s becoming harder for queens to stand out or do you think they just need to dig a little deeper?

It is becoming harder for queens to stand out, but they also need to dig a little deeper. Myself included! There are trends within the drag community that almost become the standard and it can get extremely expected and boring. Also because drag is so mainstream, everyone is a critic, which is really not conducive to creativity. I’m almost afraid to experiment with something new because of how it will be received. You find out what works for you and you get comfortable.

Have any idea what your next single will be and can we get any clues into what the video will be like?

Yes! It’s called “Vanguard!” The video actually takes cues from a real life experience I had at a McDonalds.

Lastly, in the vein of Pride month: I fear a day when the gay youth will take everything they have for granted, which I thankfully think has yet to fully happen. What would you, still being so young, like to say to the youth of tomorrow?

Well, seeing as marriage equality just passed in all 50 states, I’d like to say that this is a small step that has been long overdue. There are tons more issues we have to tackle within the queer community. Much like in other minority groups, I don’t think the fight will ever be over.

Curious? GayHotMovies.com and FetishMovies.com are your one stop shops for all of your BDSM and fetish video needs. For more from this author, including hot and humorous porno reviews, follow @HairyBurgher.

Violet Chachki’s album Gagged is available on iTunes, and be sure to check out the videos for “Bettie” and “Vanguard” available on YouTube.

www.violetchachki.net

www.facebook.com/VioletChachkiOfficial

www.twitter.com/VioletChachki

www.youtube.com/VioletChachki

www.instagram.com/VioletChachki

Photos (2013-2015) courtesy of one of Violet’s best friends, Jon Dean of Jon Dean Photography. Originally from Columbus, GA, Jon received a BFA in Photography from the Savannah College of Art and Design. In 2013, Jon co-founded Legendary Children Atlanta, an artist collective celebrating drag and queer art in the southeast. He currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of Wussy Mag, an Atlanta based online magazine covering queer culture in the southeast.

www.jondeanphoto.com

www.wussymag.com

 

 

A Brief History Of Pride

Friday, June 26th, 2015

This Sunday, June 28th, marks the 46th anniversary of the riots that ensued after NYC police raided the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village in 1969. Police raids on bars that catered to homosexuals were not uncommon, and patrons were often arrested while cameras waited outside to splash their faces across the newspapers as social pariahs and deviants. The Stonewall Inn was frequented by the poorest of the community in the ghetto for gays that was the West Village. Transgender people, femme boys, drag queens, male prostitutes, and homeless youth all found refuge inside of the low-ceilinged establishment; for them, it was a safe haven.

Yours truly on a recent visit

In the early hours of that morning, a typical police raid quickly spiraled out of the men in blues’ control, the community had enough. A crowd began to gather in the street as patrons were loaded into police wagons, peaceful at first, but once the police began mistreating those arrested, the taunts took to a more physical approach. Outraged, the crowd started with pennies and then bottles to pelt the police cars and wagons until all hell broke loose. The crowds fought back, all the while taunting the police, and something big was about to be born. Years of oppression had reached a boiling point and it would spread across the country and the globe. The LGBT community had a voice and it was time to be heard.

From that turbulent weekend of June 27th through 29th, 1969, the idea of Pride blossomed. The community wasn’t going to let anyone shame them anymore, and they were not going to hide in the corners and pretend anymore; they were going to show everyone that there was nothing wrong with them. The following year, on June 28th, 1970, the first Pride marches took to the streets of New York City. Crowds of people who were considered an abomination came out to prove to the world that they were here, many, and one. That was forty-six years ago, and Pride continues to evolve.

By 1978, the movement for LGBT rights was gaining momentum. In San Francisco, another Pride parade was in the spotlight. The march had become a peaceful protest and celebration of the community. That year, although receiving multiple threats on his life, openly gay city supervisor Harvey Milk rode in a spectacular parade atop an open car before delivering one of his iconic speeches. That year we were introduced to a symbol now known around the globe as a symbol of hope, resilience, perseverance, and celebration: the rainbow flag. Unfortunately, the party couldn’t last; just sixth months after Harvey rang in Pride that year he was murdered in city hall with Mayor Moscone by fellow supervisor Dan White. Riots would erupt in San Francisco. The community was sick of the cops, and the cops were sick of the community. It was a recipe that only meant disaster. Amidst the ashes, we rallied again and peacefully mourned the loss of such a respected leader with a candlelight march and vigil that now represents a moment in time that has imprinted itself in Pride to this day.

A storm was brewing and as it grew, something no one could have ever expected poured down on the LGBT community, devastating lives and taking with it almost an entire generation. The 1980’s were the playground of the angel of death. A plague was sweeping through at an alarming rate and no one knew what it was until it was horribly too late. AIDS would tear our world apart, yet bring us even closer. The “gay cancer” was taking lives in unprecedented numbers, and it was mainly men who were affected. Up until then Gays and Lesbians had been mutually self segregated, but as the disease spread it was the Lesbians who came in to nurse the victims when no one else would. We were all over the news and awareness of our numbers became more relevant. Once again the community was one massive pariah. Ignorance overtook understanding; it was time for another uprising.

In 1987, ACT UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power), known for their motto “silence = death,” was formed. Pressuring the government to acknowledge the effects of AIDS as not just a “gay disease,” ACT UP demanded them to recognize it and take action. We were angrier than ever before and from this anger, fear, and death, we found new strength to continue our fight for equality. Finally the world was taking notice we were gaining allies with people the public respected. That same year the Names Project would recognize so many lost to AIDS. It is a national treasure and a testimony of love. Pride had a new meaning yet again.

With the arrival of a new decade our understanding of HIV and AIDS advanced, yet still the struggle continued. A light was beginning to shine in the darkness again. We were being accepted more than ever before. We were becoming mainstream; in fact, we were being emulated then. But with the light comes the darkness. Just as the decade was closing a young man would lose his life alone tied to a fence in Wyoming a victim of savageness and ignorance. Matthew Shepard’s story dragged a dark and ugly subject into the public eye, something that happened every day. Horrific acts of hate have against the LGBT community are very real, and unfortunately Matthew’s life was lost just like thousands of others before we started talking about it. His passing was also the subject of the successful play “The Laramie Project.” Just over a decade later, the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act was passed by Congress, another step forward at too high a cost.

In the brand new millennium, the closet doors were bursting open and the LGBT community was truly over the rainbow. We greeted the beginning of a new century with more open arms than ever before. Our achievements were finally getting the credit they deserved and our battle continued. More advances were being made in the medical field too as  HIV was finally losing some of its stigma as a death sentence. The decade also brought serious stories about our community to mainstream film. Brokeback Mountain and Milk stand out as two important films that were widely received by the public in general. Milk, the story of Harvey Milk, was a film that told a story we wanted the world to know, and with its director and cast Harvey’s story was told as a brilliant tribute thirty years after his death.

Now halfway through the second decade of the 2000’s, Pride, now in its forties, has grown and matured into what it is today, but that could change tomorrow. A pill to help prevent the spread of HIV is now available, DADT (Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell) was repealed, DOMA (Defense of Marriage Act) has been shot down; yes, these are major wins, and there is still more to do. There are still places in this world where being LGBT is punishable by death. Hate still rears its ugly head, and we have quite the road ahead of us. The Transgender community is finally getting long awaited recognition in their struggle for acceptance and equality, a fight that still has a long way to go. There is still violence against us, and there is still ignorance, bigotry, and prejudice, but we can change that, and that is what Pride is all about. Pride is a time to celebrate our community and all that is good within it, although there are changes that still must come within as well.

Laverne Cox

Pride is more than just a party, more than just a few days in June. Pride is inside of us. Pride is our past, our present, and our future.

And just breaking today, June 26th, 2015, the United States Supreme Court has ruled that marriage equality is effective and protected in all fifty states-just one more reason to be proud.

Happy Pride

-The Otter

Pride In Porn Directing

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015

June 28th, 2015, will mark the 46th  anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in New York City. The events that took place that summer in 1969 are considered the birth of the LGBT movement; June 28th is the date that exploded with riots and would later be transformed into a date of celebration. Pride isn’t just about a colorful parade, parties, and fun. It’s also a time to remember where we’ve been, where we are, and where we are going as we become increasingly accepted for who we are, and not just with whom we sleep.

So how does GayHotMovies.com celebrate Pride? We celebrate it every day because we are proud of our history. Had it not been for the rioters at Stonewall or the LGBT activists who fought for our rights, everyone involved in the porn business wouldn’t be where they are today. We owe credit to those who laid the groundwork and to what has been accomplished since that time. Laws were on the books saying that distribution any type of sexual homosexual material could get you arrested and blacklisted before the beginning of the sexual revolution. When the community finally said “enough is enough,” all of our doors came bursting open.

As the movement continues and transforms, so does pornography. In my opinion, these five directors paved the way in how we watch porn. Artists in their own right, each of my picks brought/brings something new to the table. In alphabetical order, of course…

Al Parker

He is an icon, an ideal, and irreplaceable. Al Parker was the quintessential gay porn star who stole the hearts and loins of his fans with his handsome looks, sexual stamina, massive cock, and on screen presence. Discovered by COLT as an afterthought for something different,” Parker was not the typical COLT man; his body was muscled but not to the extreme-he was an every-man. Perhaps that is why Parker found huge success as he embodied the attainable. He was that guy you could meet on the street. The look stuck and soon after his debut, “clones” began emulating him in a big way that we still see today. As an artist, Parker wasn’t fulfilled by just being on the screen. Behind the lens he would direct and star in films from his own Surge Studios. Al Parker is the stuff of legend. His influence has spanned the decades and shall continue to do so far into the future.

Chi Chi LaRue

Her career is undoubtedly one of legendary proportions. If you’ve watched any gay porn in the last 25 years, you’ve probably (no, you have) seen the work of Chi Chi LaRue. Over 570 titles bear testament of this gay porn icon. With a career spanning this long, the lady’s impact has not gone unnoticed. A fierce advocate of safe sex practices on film, LaRue is well known for her Wrap. It. Up. campaign promoting condom use in the gay community in a time when the world was still reeling from the horrible effects of the AIDS and HIV epidemic. LaRue still stands her ground when it comes to safe sex practices and creates films that are both incredibly hot and responsible.

Jake Jaxson

Taking porn to a whole new level: Jake Jaxson has proven that smut is art, and art is smut. The COCKYBOYS director has been turning out gloriously elaborate films with incredible story lines, gorgeous locations, superb dramatic performances, and a keen eye for detail. Jaxson is, in every sense, a true artist. His productions tell stories paralleling the human experience in what can be all at once dark, lighthearted, and hopeful. Utilizing everything from the changing seasons, elaborate costuming, antiques, set design, and locations, Jaxson has elevated the genre to something far more than just performers having sex. Through his direction we can see the cinematic future of gay porn as something that doesn’t have to be hidden in the sock drawer, but something we can proudly display in our homes, like the beautiful coffee table books from COCKYBOYS that take us behind the scenes into a world of beauty.

Nica Noelle

She’s not your typical director, that’s for sure. Nica Noelle sets no boundaries for herself when it comes to her films. Straight, gay, lesbian, transgender-her tastes in telling stories through pornography are limitless. Continually blurring the lines between what is socially acceptable and what is taboo has catapulted Noelle into a realm of her own. Running several studios catering to different demographics has hardly cramped Noelle’s style, nor her ability to produce and direct beautifully shot films that are wildly successful. Time and time again, we see just how Nica Noelle is yet another groundbreaking individual in the world of gay porn.

Wakefield Poole

Pioneering the gay porn industry with only a handful of erotic films is something of a marvel. Wakefield Poole is one such director who shaped the way we watch our pornography. With his iconic film Boys in the Sand, Poole masterfully blends the erotic into a story line that had not been done before. The picture, filmed over a course of weeks on Fire Island, was a huge success. Promoted as a typical mainstream movie, Boys in the Sand proved that the world was ready for gay porn to emerge from its underground roots. Although Wakefield Poole’s later endeavors were not as critically acclaimed as Boys in the Sand, there is no doubt that his influence upon the industry is undisputed.

These are just five of the outstanding directors who have brought us the films we love. They continue to inspire us in an ever changing world that is both embraced and repulsed in our society. Through determination and a true love of the art, we must thank everyone who has had a hand in bringing our fantasies to life. From the ones who first took pictures in secrecy, to the ones who had enough of the oppression, the ones who were in the background editing and distributing, to the performers and fluffers as well, we owe a lot to an industry that has helped open the doors to sexual freedom. To each and every one of you, Happy Pride from GayHotMovies.com.

Now get on and get off.

Catch ya later cum catchers,

-The Otter

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter and Tumblr!

Breakdown: A Rare Glimpse Of Pride Gone By In This Classic

Monday, June 15th, 2015

The Gay Freedom Day Committee led the throngs of participants down Market Street during the 1978 Gay Pride Parade in San Francisco. This spectacular display remains the mother of all Pride parades although it took place thirty-seven years ago. Here in the city by the bay, the first rainbow flags made their debut; at the time there were eight stripes on the flag, now simplified to six. This was also another milestone year when openly gay Supervisor Harvey Milk, having received plenty of threats on his life, rode the parade route in an open car waving to the crowds. Sadly, just one day shy of five full months later, he would be gunned down in City Hall along with Mayor George Moscone by Dan White, thus becoming a martyr for the LGBTQ rights movement. On that day, however, June 28th commemorates the Stonewall riots of New York City just eight years before, everything was gloriously gay in every sense of the word.

Harvey Milk

Breakdown director John Travis was there that beautiful, sunny San Francisco day. What a better day to celebrate a community bursting at the seams to be heard, and what better a day to celebrate over a decade of sexual revolution. In Breakdown, we have some rare footage from that Pride. Of course, it makes me wonder how many people even know this footage exists, or if it has ever been used in any films or documentaries. The scene is titled “The Big Parade” and I can tell you, it surprised me and surpassed my expectations. I had stumbled across the film before and read that there was some retro Pride parade footage in the film; what I did not know was that it was the 1978 parade, and that it was not stock footage.

If anything, seek out Breakdown on GayHotMovies.com from Bijou Classics to get a glimpse of one of the most outstanding Pride parades ever, and then go do some research for yourself as to why June is such a special month for all members of our community. It is so important that we remember what came before us so that we can continue our fight for equality. Perhaps you will be inspired this Pride season to fly your colors a little higher and raise your voice a little louder.

Now on to the sex.

After the ”The Big Parade,” we have a hot scene between a mustachioed go-go man and one of the guys who attended the parade. These guys really celebrate in a sloppy free for all involving some intense acrobatics to boot. Also, take a moment to appreciate the hunky dancer’s Levi’s; that’s right, he made sure to wear those out in all the right places in the shower with a wire brush (a common practice in the seventies to accentuate your bulge).

Far away from the parade, a business man finds himself stranded in the countryside. Along come two buck naked equestrians upon their painted ponies. The strangers might not be able to fix the guy’s pretty blue car, but they can do a whole lot more than ride bareback. Check out this scene which gives the film its title Breakdown.

The third and final scene is a far cry from our first and second scenes. “Sling-A Leather Fantasy” made me either want to cry or fuck. Seriously, this juxtaposition of a couple in bed and then in an alternate leather fantasy is a bit difficult to describe. What I can tell you is that it is in no way gentle as the muscle bound couple take whatever they want from each other. From some serious dick to face slapping, chest pounding, and nearly wrestling, this duo packs a wallop in a load after load dream come true. All this, and it is set to an amazing disco soundtrack.

Happy Pride to one and all! Get on over to GayHotMovies.com, the website where you will find Exactly What You’re Looking For.

Remember to follow me on Twitter and Tumblr!

Catch ya later cum catchers,

The Otter

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